Corsair Strafe RGB Silent Keyboard for Discrete Players

Corsair Strafe RGB Silent Keyboard for Discrete Players

This quiet Corsair keyboard features the all-new Cherry mechanical switches, which promise to reduce the noise of the gamer keyboards by 30%. We will see if the German manufacturer keeps his word. On unpacking, we discover a keyboard with reasonable dimensions of 44.8 x 17 x 4 cm (W x L x H), not including the removable palmrest that adds 6.4 cm. The chassis is made of very slightly rough black plastic, with the exception of the shiny white plastic sides. It presents simple lines as well as a pleasant impression of solidity.

With its weight of 1.35 kg, this keyboard is clearly not intended to be moved regularly. There is also evidence of the fragile attachments of the wrist rests that one is afraid to break with each manipulation. Click here if you wanna learn more about such silent keyboards or wanna see more reviews and buyers guide.

Same observation in front of the keyboard cable that left us perplexed. Corsair has indeed strangely chosen to adorn his Strafe with a power cable as massive as rigid. It will therefore struggle a little while to get the cable on a cluttered desk, and even more to enter the keyboard in a bag or in its own box. It is unfortunate that Corsair has not opted for a braided cable finer, flexible and strong, like those that equip most recent keyboards, even those that offer multiple USB ports and jacks.

However, we appreciate the presence of an additional USB port that allows connecting a mouse, for example, directly on the Strafe.

Do both keyboard posed and duly connected, so it is easy to place on the desktop without being too bulky? Too bad however that it does not have a sufficient number of skates and especially that the retractable feet are not endowed. If they are raised, the keyboard tends to slip easily on some coatings. If some people prefer to play with the keyboard flat, others – like us – are more comfortable with a certain inclination and may prefer to add skates to the feet of Strafe. For comparison, we note that the Strafe offers only seven skates counting the palm rest where other keyboards like the Cherry MX Board 6.0 board up to 16.

For slicing with the relatively smooth plastic frame, the palm rest features raised patterns that serve both aesthetics and ergonomics.

Indeed, the skin of the hands does not slip and the whole is not especially messy. However, we regret that the reduced size of this wrist rest does not allow … to put his wrist. Only the palms can find a place, even by tapping the highest keys. For those who are in the habit of positioning their hands high enough, it will not change much, but for others, we can expect to feel a little tired during long sessions.

The RGB Silent Strafe does not have macro buttons, although all buttons are programmable via the software. However, there are two extra useful buttons, which are used to directly turn off the backlight and block the Windows key, to avoid office returns in full.

The keypad also has large LEDs that indicate whether the keypad, capital letters, or scroll stop function is enabled. The Strafe has a large catalog of bright animations, in addition to the 16.8 million colors available. The raised keys and their white outline beautifully emphasize the backlight, which is more diffuse and soft. If this function is still purely aesthetic for the moment, it has a certain effect on printable colleagues and on the children – including the function “ripple” that produces waves of different colors with each support.

Of course, the major evolution of this keyboard Strafe RGB Silent is in its mechanical switches deemed quieter than conventional switches. Our device is equipped with Red versions, which provide on a normal keyboard like the MX Board 6.0 a long strike (4 mm to press the button completely), an activation distance of 2 mm and a relatively soft touch, due to an effect of light spring and linear support. Those who like to molest their keyboard do not usually turn to the MX Red, because of this easy and rather soft typing. This trend is increased with the Silent version of the switches from Cherry. If the mechanical strike is attractive for its pleasant sensation – you feel the striking – and its accuracy, we can quickly feel deafened by the resonance of the impact of the keys on the chassis. Until now, you could buy rubber rings to install around the switch to smother the slapping of plastic, but if the operation is not expensive, it can be tedious. Cherry proposes here a keyboard whose keys are already surrounded by dampers intended to make them quieter.