Support the CRM tool change and ensure its success

crm

Change is always stressful for schools and individuals, even when it is voluntary and planned. Here are some tips to support the “change curve” and optimize the implementation of a CRM strategy in your institution.

The curve of change, originally defined by psychiatrist Elisabeth Kubler-Ross to illustrate the phases of mourning among individuals, was then adapted to the business world by many economists. It originally has several steps that can be divided into 4 distinct phases.

Phase 1 – Shock

When change is initiated, employees may be in a state of shock or denial. Indeed, even if it has been planned for a long time and even if it is perceived as a good thing in the state of project (“it would be nice to have a new tool”), its launch anchors in the real and gives rise to anxieties.

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At this stage, it is important for employees to understand the situation. For that, it is necessary from the start:

  • Designate an interlocutor for their questions
  • Focus on the facts to prevent a myth from being created around the new tool.

The accompaniment of change is therefore crucial from the beginning.

Phase 2 – Depression

Once the reality of change is integrated, negative reactions manifest themselves around fear and anger about change and what is perceived as lost. Resistance can settle against it and can last.
It is a delicate moment and it is not necessarily due to a lack of vision on the part of the teams: some may feel threatened because they were experts of the previous tool, others may feel wronged by the decisions taken for the new tool etc. This is a decisive phase for successful change: if we do not leave, we risk the crisis.Visit for more information http://www.itsolutionssolved.com.au.

Faced with these resistances, it is very important:

  • To anticipate as much as possible the objections raised
  • To treat case by case and face to face blocking points to find a solution serenely
  • Focusing on goals first
  • To stay in a constructive listening for the “hot” reactions that can be noticed.

Phase 3 – Construction

Phase 3 is the turning point of this curve: thanks to the good management of phase 2, the teams begin to accept the change and to really look at the implications of it and the new ways of working.

To accompany this phase, it is advisable:

  • To be available to answer questions from teams
  • To let them take ownership of the tool, allowing time to become familiar with it and adapt habits.

It is also interesting to work with early adopters who will be prescribers for the rest of the team.

Phase 4 – Commitment

Finally the end of the curve!

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Phase 4 is engagement, where the use of the tool becomes fluid and natural and where users benefit from the progress of change. The real benefits of it appear from this phase.

The key word during the transition period due to the tool change is therefore the accompaniment .

The experience of our team reveals that the resolution of the change due to the introduction of Melbourne Campus CRM generally takes place over a period of 3 months to 1 year .
During this period, we found that phase 2 resistance decreases when teams are involved and valued at their level by:

  • Listening to each person’s needs before centralizing them,
  • The treatment of objections with concrete examples,
  • And of course the designation of a referent for these answers and the installation of the CRM.